plants

Carapa grandiflora Seed Dispersal studies

The study focuses on the dispersal ofCarapa grandiflora (Carapa or African crabwood ) by larger mammals (especially elephants) in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park.  The lead researchers are Aisha Nyiramana (PhD student, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle and University of Butare lecturer in Rwanda), Dr.

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Lichen distribution and diversity in Bwindi (by Andreas Frisch)

In May 2011, ITFC had the privilege of hosting Andreas Frisch, a post-doc Lichenologist from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) in Uppsala. Andreas comes to Bwindi to conduct an inventory of the ecology, distribution and diversity of lichens in the park, which is the first such study in Uganda. 

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Resource use (Multiple Use Program)

Plant use by local people in and around Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (BINP) is as old as mankind that has lived there. Humans used plants for food, medicine, craft making, clothing, building and artwork. When Bwindi forest was made a National Park in 1991, local people were stopped from harvesting resources from the park, yet they played an important role in their livelihoods. Conflicts arose between BINP managers and local people, resulting in widespread fires and intense poaching.

Vegetation Plots in Bwindi

tree measuring.JPGSix 1-hectare permanent sample plots were established for vegetation monitoring, two in each of the lower, middle and higher altitude zone of BINP. In each plot, all trees, tree ferns and lianas with a diameter-at-breast-height of at least 10 cm are mapped, measured and identified.  The vegetation plots are remeasured each year between December and February (dry season).

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Phenology

In 2011, ITFC established a new monitoring activity, funded by a Climate Change grant fromthe MacArthur Foundation, through WCS. This type of study –called phenology –assesses variation in the timing of the events in a plant’s life cycle i.e. seasonal changes in leaf bearing and shedding, flowering and seed production.

Why a phenology study in Bwindi?

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