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Publications & Reports

Regulated access to wild climbers has enhanced food security and minimized use of plastics by frontline households at a premier African protected area

Year of publication
2020

The amount of food harvested, processed and stored by households determines food availability—a key dimension to food security. In developing countries, frontline households around protected areas harvest wild climbers for making food security products. When access to the wild climbers is denied, households adapt by using other available alternatives such as plastics with potential con- sequences to biodiversity. The relationships between harvesting wild climbers and: (a) food availability, (b) plastic use, and (c) wild climber populations have rarely been investigated.

VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENTS OF PROTECTED AREAS OF THE GREATER VIRUNGA LANDSCAPE VIS A VIS CLIMATE CHANGE AND OTHER THREATS TO BIODIVERSITY UNDER DIFFERENT CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS

Year of publication
2019

The study was carried out under the Greater Virunga Transboundary Collaboration (GVTC) involving the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Rwanda and Uganda. The collaborative transboundary framework of programs, plans and activities is aimed at conserving the network of Protected Areas (PAs) in the Greater Virunga Landscape (GVL).

Beyond gorillas Local economic development through tourism at Bwindi Impenetrable National Park

Year of publication
2019

The Local Economic Development Through Pro-Poor Tourism project has demonstrated that it is possible to develop sustainable livelihood opportunities from tourism – even when they are not based on the main tourism attraction themselves. At Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, tourists visit to see gorillas. None of the enterprises supported by this project are offering gorilla viewing tours, yet they all have complementary products that can enhance the main tourism attraction. 

The Ecological Implications of Harvesting Wild Climbers for Food Security products around Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, South Western Uganda

Year of publication
2019

Sustainable utilisation of Non Timber Forest Products (NTFPS) is a widely accepted forestry management approach. Unfortunately the sustainability of NTFPS in high demand like the wild climbers used by local communities is rarely investigated over a period of time. Yet extraction of these wild climbers by local community for food security purposes has been on going in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park(BINP) since 1994.