ITFC header intro

Publications & Reports

Occupancy winners in tropical protected forests: a pantropical analysis

Year of publication
2022

The structure of forest mammal communities appears surprisingly consist- ent across the continental tropics, presumably due to convergent evolution in similar environments. Whether such consistency extends to mammal occupancy, despite variation in species characteristics and context, remains unclear. Here we ask whether we can predict occupancy patterns and, if so, whether these relationships are consistent across biogeographic regions. Specifically, we assessed how mammal feeding guild, body mass and eco- logical specialization relate to occupancy in protected forests across the tropics.

Long-term funding of community projects has contributed to mitigation of illegal activities within a premier African protected area, Bwindi impenetrable National Park, Uganda

Year of publication
2022

At Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (hereafter Bwindi), illegal activities often provide major challenges to park management. In 1994, an Integrated Conservation and Development Program (ICDP) was introduced in Bwindi as a novel park management approach that included among others, funding of community projects in park adjacent communities. This study assessed key drivers of illegal activities and the impact of long-term funding of community projects on illegal activities reduction in Bwindi.

Smallholder Knowledge of Local Climate Conditions Predicts Positive On-Farm Outcomes

Year of publication
2022

People’s observations of climate change and its impacts, mediated by cultures and capacities, shape adaptive responses. Adaptation is critical in regions of rainfed smallholder agriculture where changing rainfall patterns have dis- proportionate impacts on livelihoods, yet scientific climate data to inform responses are often sparse. Despite calls for better integration of local knowledge into adaptation frameworks, there is a lack of empirical evidence linking both small- holder climate observations and scientific data to on-farm outcomes.

IMPACTS OF ANTHROPOGENIC ACTIVITIES ON THE BIODIVERSITY STATUS OF KASYOHA-KITOMI CENTRAL FOREST RESERVE, WESTERN UGANDA

Year of publication
2022

Different species occupy different niches in the web cycle of life. Knowing what species inhabit an ecosystem, and how many of each kind there are, is critical to understanding that ecosystem's structure and function, and predicting future changes. Tropical forest ecosystems are known for sheltering the greatest biodiversity by comparison with many other ecosystems located in the same climatic zone. The tropical Forests are essential for life on earth and about 1.6 billion people depend on them for their livelihood.

A comparative assessment of biodiversity changes in Echuya Central Forest Reserve following anthropogenic activities between 2015 and 2021

Year of publication
2022

Biodiversity is one of the fundamental properties of nature and source of immense potential for economic use and yet the ecological functions performed by the biological diversity are still less understood. Tropical forests are arguably the most biologically diverse places on planet with many endemic and rare species within. Unfortunately an estimated 154 million ha of these tropical forest are cleared each year by human activities for mainly cattle ranching and agriculture.

Global camera trap synthesis highlights the importance of protected areas in maintaining mammal diversity

Year of publication
2022

The establishment of protected areas (PAs) is a central strategy for global biodi- versity conservation. While the role of PAs in protecting habitat has been high- lighted, their effectiveness at protecting mammal communities remains unclear. We analyzed a global dataset from over 8671 camera traps in 23 countries on four continents that detected 321 medium- to large-bodied mammal species.

Consistent daily activity patterns across tropical forest mammal communities

Year of publication
2022

vMost animals follow distinct daily activity patterns reecting their adaptations1, requirements, and interactions2-4. Specic communities provide specic opportunities and constraints to their members that further shape these patterns3,4. Here, we ask whether community-level diel activity patterns among long-separated biogeographic regions differ or converge and whether the resulting patterns indicate top- down (predation risk) or bottom-up processes (prey availability)?