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Publications & Reports

Higher Maximum Temperature Increases the Frequency of Water Drinking in Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei)

Year of publication
2022

Water plays a vital role in many aspects of sustaining life, including thermoregulation. Given that increasing temperatures and more extreme weather events due to climate change are predicted to influence water availability, understanding how species obtain and use water is critical. This is especially true for endangered species in small isolated populations which are vulnerable to drought and the risk of extinction.

The number of tree species on Earth

Year of publication
2022

One of the most fundamental questions in ecology is how many species inhabit the Earth. However, due to massive logistical and financial challenges and taxonomic difficulties connected to the species concept definition, the global numbers of species, includ- ing those of important and well-studied life forms such as trees, still remain largely unknown. Here, based on global ground- sourced data, we estimate the total tree species richness at global, continental, and biome levels.

Woodlot management and livelihoods in a tropical conservation landscape

Year of publication
2021

In biodiversity hotspots, there is often tension between human needs and conservation, exacerbated when protected areas prevent access to natural resources. Forest- dependent people may compensate for exclusion by managing unprotected forests or cultivating planted woodlots. Outside Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda, household wood product needs are high and population growth puts pressure on the environment. We investigated the role of privately and collectively managed woodlots in provisioning wood products and supporting local livelihoods.

The Impact of Bwindi Mgahinga Conservation Trust and Uganda Wildlife Authority’s Funded Community Livelihood Projects in the Mitigation of Illegal Activities within Bwindi Impenetrable National Park

Year of publication
2021

Illegal resource access is a pressing biodiversity conservation and protected area management challenge. At Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (Bwindi) in south western Uganda, poaching and unauthorised access to forest resources is rife, driven primarily by poverty. An Integrated Conservation and Development Program (ICDP) was established in Bwindi in 1994 to address local community livelihoods, whilst dissuading illegal activity and associated impacts on the protected area.

Woodlot management and livelihoods in a tropical conservation landscape

Year of publication
2021

In biodiversity hotspots, there is often tension between human needs and conservation, exacerbated when protected areas prevent access to natural resources. Forest- dependent people may compensate for exclusion by managing unprotected forests or cultivating planted woodlots. Outside Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda, household wood product needs are high and population growth puts pressure on the environment. We investigated the role of privately and collectively managed woodlots in provisioning wood products and supporting local livelihoods.

Taking the pulse of Earth’s tropical forests using networks of highly distributed plots

Year of publication
2020

Tropical forests are the most diverse and productive ecosystems on Earth. While better understanding of these forests is critical for our collective future, until quite recently efforts to measure and monitor them have been largely disconnected. Networking is essential to discover the answers to questions that transcend borders and the horizons of funding agencies. Here we show how a global community is responding to the challenges of tropical ecosystem research with diverse teams measuring forests tree-by-tree in thousands of long-term plots.

Regulated access to wild climbers has enhanced food security and minimized use of plastics by frontline households at a premier African protected area

Year of publication
2020

The amount of food harvested, processed and stored by households determines food availability—a key dimension to food security. In developing countries, frontline households around protected areas harvest wild climbers for making food security products. When access to the wild climbers is denied, households adapt by using other available alternatives such as plastics with potential con- sequences to biodiversity. The relationships between harvesting wild climbers and: (a) food availability, (b) plastic use, and (c) wild climber populations have rarely been investigated.